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5 Tips to Conquer Flying Anxiety

Flying anxiety can put a damper on your travel plans. Whether you’re traveling for work or vacation, a fear of flying can make the experience unbearable. But there are some tips you can implement to help you feel better faster and travel with confidence.

Breathe
Taking deep breaths is one of the fastest, simplest ways you can slow down a racing heart and calm anxiety. For many people, takeoff and landing are the most anxiety-inducing portions of their trip. If this is the case, begin taking slow, calculated deep breaths as soon as you get buckled into your seat. Close your eyes and breathe in through your nose for a slow count of five. Slowly release your breath through your mouth for another count of five. Continue this pattern and if you find yourself getting distracted, recenter your focus on your breath. By focusing on the simple act of breathing, you can distract yourself from the panic you might feel about the movements of the plane.

Stay Calm
Sometimes breathing isn’t enough to calm flying anxiety. You can also try taking something to relieve your stress. Genexa’s Stress Relief is an organic medicine designed to relieve stress and anxiety and help you feel more calm and relaxed. The chewable tablets are easy to throw in your bag, and you can take them as soon as you start to feel symptoms. Close your eyes, sit back, and try to relax.

Talk to a Therapist
A fear of flying is a serious thing, and there are trained professionals who can help you work through the anxiety. Talking through your fear with a therapist can help you gain control of the anxiety and symptoms you experience. It can take a few sessions, or even months, before you feel like you have a grasp on your flying anxiety. And that’s ok. Give yourself credit for trying to overcome this fear.

Consider an Emotional Support Animal
Emotional support animals are animals who have been trained and certified to assist with an emotional or psychiatric disorder. With the proper documentation, these animals are permitted to sit in the airplane cabin with their own and do not need to be in a kennel or crate. The comfort of an emotional support animal can sometimes help ease flying anxiety and stress. Talk to your therapist to see if an emotional support animal is right for you.

Practice Patience
Dealing with a fear that causes anxiety is a serious matter, and not something that can change overnight. Practice patience with yourself and understand that the steps you take to ease flying anxiety may take time.

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